If Avian influenza, or other disease, strikes a commercial broiler house, the industry and agricultural departments must react immediately to prevent the spread of disease.

100% Effective

Field tested and developed with input from the poultry industry, the Avi-FoamGuard has been proven 100% effective in depopulating infected poultry houses. Researchers and veterinarians have learned that using foam with the right bubble size is a practical, humane and effective method for mass depopulation. It creates an occlusion in the trachea of birds, causing immediate hypoxia in less than three minutes. Crews can depopulate a large commercial broiler house in less than an hour using our proven technology, U.L.-listed non-toxic foam, and the straightforward controls of the Avi-FoamGuard.

Efficient & Safe

Local producers, agriculture departments, and emergency management personnel can quickly learn to operate the equipment and can rely on its ease of use. Specially designed to reduce the number of personnel who must enter a facility, the Avi-FoamGuard greatly reduces biosecurity risk over prior methods. From set-up to clean-up, the Avi-FoamGuard system requires only a two-person crew to operate, representing an enormous savings in cost and time. Even better, only one operator needs to enter a facility. Avi-FoamGuard gives commercial producers a simple method that quickly suppresses infected poultry without unduly stressing poultry or personnel; it may even enhance the composting process necessary to neutralize viruses.

Other Methods Aren’t Practical

Current methods - including whole-house CO2 gas poly-tents or live-haul cage depopulation - waste valuable time. They expose large crews to unnecessary risk of infection. Other methods

“Foam is a proven method for depopulation. The Avi-FoamGuard system effectively and easily achieves whole-house depopulation without undue stress to poultry—and with minimal exposure of its single operator.” Bud Malone
Poultry Extension Specialist
University of Delaware
such as cervical dislocation are stressful to both poultry and personnel. Using any of these methods in the event of an outbreak would require a significant crew and would result in substantial costs. Moreover, such methods continually expose crews to sick or virus-infected animals.